BREAKING ALL THE RULES of Rhyme Schemes | Mastering Your Rhyming Skills



Today I’m going to share a technique that you can use to enhance and unlock many more possibilities of what you can achieve with your rhyme schemes.

When it comes to rapping, it’s a common practice to place your rhymes on or around the 4th beat of each bar within your rhyme scheme. These are known as “end rhymes” and this is a great way to create a solid rhyme scheme pattern that’s easy for your listeners to make sense of.

But as I say at the end of my videos, when it comes to rapping, theirs no rules, theirs only techniques. And today, I’m going to demonstrate how you can shift the placement of your end rhymes in 5 different ways to give your overall rhyme scheme more dynamics which can make it sound more interesting. And I’m very curious to hear which one of these examples I’m about to share is your favorite so be sure to let me know in the comments section below.

Also today I’m going to be rapping over an instrumental that I produced called “Midnight Drive” and if you like this instrumental you can get it over on my beat store.

Now let’s take a listen to the first example. 

In our 1st example, I’ve structured my end rhymes in the traditional way of landing on the 4th beat for all 4 bars.


#1 END RHYMES

Now, this sounded great but let’s push the boundaries a little further and break the uniformity of the rhyme scheme a little bit. Now I’m going to continue to place my end rhymes on the 4th beat of bars 1-3 but on bar 4 I’m going to place my end rhyme on the 3rd beat.

I was able to achieve this by extending the length of the pause at the beginning of the 1st beat on the 4th bar and then I reworded this line to pretty much say the same thing but in fewer syllables.


#2 EARLY 4TH

Now let’s push it even further and flip flop our end rhymes so that they never land on the same beat consecutively. I’m going to place my end rhymes on the 4th beat for bars 1 and 3 and then I’m going to place my end rhymes on the 3rd beat for bars 2 and 4.

To achieve this I simply kept the adjustments I already made from the previous example on bar 4 and I used the same techniques on Bar 2. I extended the pause on the 1st beat of bar 2 and then I reworded this phrase to say the same thing in fewer syllables in order to make “slay rhymes” land on the 3rd beat.


#3 FLIP FLOP

Now that was pretty cool but I started feeling like I had too much empty space on bars 2 and 3 so I filled in bar 2 more by reducing the length of the pause on the 1st beat and adding two more syllables with the word “also”. And on the 4th beat reduced the length of the pause and added, “I been”. 

Also at the beginning of bar 3, I removed the pause on the 1st beat and added: “Known to”.

On bar 4 I also reduced the length of the pause and added the word “some” on the 2 beat.


#4 FLIP FLOP (filled in more)

Now let’s push things in a totally different direction and do the inverse of what I did on my 2nd example where the end rhyme on bars 1-3 landed on the 4th beat and the end rhyme on bar 4 landed on the 3rd beat. 

Now I’m going to place my end rhyme on the 3rd beat for bars 1-3 and then I’m going to place my end rhyme on the 4th beat on bar 4.

I achieved this by rewording bar 1 so that it uses fewer syllables. I also adjusted the placement of the word “and” to come in at the end of bar 1 instead of the beginning of bar 2. This move was necessary since I just shifted what was landing on the 4th beat to the 3rd beat, so now I had empty space that I needed to fill in.

On bar 2 I added the words “plus You’ll” and “you can” to fill in the bar a bit more so that “slay rhymes” lands on the 3rd beat. I also adjusted the placement of “murk the” to land at the end of bar 2 (for the same reason as the previous bar) to feel this bar end more since I shifted the end rhyme from the 4th beat to the 3rd beat which created empty space.

This also removed enough syllables from bar 3 to make “dang minds” land on the 3rd beat.

I also added “an” in front of “murk the” to make my wording feel more conversational and natural.

On bar 3 I adjusted the placement of “now that’s what” from the beginning of the 4th bar to land at the end of bar 3 to fill in empty space.

On bar 4 I added “I like to refer to as good ole fashion” to fill this bar in much more while positioning hangtime to land on the 4th beat.


#5 LATE 4TH

 

Now, these are only a few examples of the many different ways you can shift your rhyme schemes around and make them sound good. I encourage you to continue to play around with this concept and see what cool variations you can come up with.

Now let me know which one of these variations is your favorite by dropping a comment in the comments section below! 👇

My name is Cole Mize with colemizestudios.com where I strive to make you a better rapper now. If you’re trying to perfect your rap skills make sure you get yourself a FREE copy of my eBook the #1 fundamental to rapping below 👇 and you’ll also get a free copy of the bar sheets that I used in this video. And always rememeber, when it comes to rapping, there’s no rules, there’s only techniques! Peace!

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